Connecticut Leg Of 2010 Tour


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iWARRIORWALK USA TOUR – STOP #37

WALKED ON OCTOBER 2, 2010

On Saturday, October 2, 2010, I (Stanley Bronstein) walked 1 1/4 hours on the campus of Yale University.  I then walked 3 hours on the campus of the University of Connecticut in Storrs, CT.  I then walked for 45 minutes in a residential neighborhood in Storrs.

Highlights of the Connecticut leg of the tour:

  • Yale University is beautiful.  Lots of history there.
  • The weather was nice, which was sure a lot better than the last few days.
  • I got to see a lot of rural Connecticut and rural Rhode Island.  I’d only seen the cities before.
  • I saw a car fire on the side of the road near Storrs, CT.  Fortunately it didn’t look like anyone was hurt.
  • The campus of the University of Connecticut was peaceful and relaxing.  A very nice setting indeed.
  • I got to my hotel in Rhode Island VERY early as I didn’t have to do much driving.  I got a chance to get 9 hours of sleep.

As usual, I recorded a podcast which can be listened to

by clicking the button right below these words.

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OPTIONAL PODCAST DOWNLOAD LINK

Here are pictures from my walk.

DOUBLE CLICK ON THE IMAGE THUMBNAILS TO VIEW FULL SIZE PICTURES

Here are 5 fast facts about Connecticut:

  • Southwestern Connecticut is part of the New York metropolitan area; three of Connecticut’s eight counties, including most of the state’s population, are in the New York City combined statistical area, commonly called the Tri-State Region. Connecticut’s center of population is in Cheshire, New Haven County.
  • Connecticut is the 29th most populous state, with 3.5 million residents, and is ranked 48th in size by area, making it the 4th most densely populated state. Called the Constitution State and the Nutmeg State, Connecticut has a long history dating from early colonial times and was influential in the development of the federal government of the United States.
  • The first major settlements were established in the 1630s by the English. Thomas Hooker led a band of followers overland from the Massachusetts Bay Colony and founded what would become the Connecticut Colony; other settlers from Massachusetts founded the Saybrook Colony and the New Haven Colony. Both the Connecticut and New Haven Colonies established documents of Fundamental Orders, considered the first constitutions in North America. In 1662, the three colonies were merged under a royal charter, making Connecticut a crown colony. This colony was one of the Thirteen Colonies that revolted against British rule in the American Revolution.
  • The name of the state is an anglicized version of the Algonquian word “quinatucquet”, meaning “upon the long river”. The Connecticut region was inhabited by the Mohegan tribe prior to European colonization. The first European explorer in Connecticut was the Dutch explorer Adriaen Block. After he explored this region in 1614, Dutch fur traders sailed up the Connecticut River (then known by the Dutch as Versche Rivier—” Fresh River”) and built a fort at Dutch Point near present-day Hartford, which they called “House of Hope” (Dutch: Huis van Hoop). John Winthrop, then of Massachusetts, received permission to create a new colony at Old Saybrook at the mouth of the Connecticut River in 1635. This was the first of three distinct colonies that later would be combined to make up Connecticut. Saybrook Colony was a direct challenge to Dutch claims. The colony was not more than a small outpost and never matured. In 1644, the Saybrook Colony merged itself into the Connecticut Colony.
  • As of 2005, Connecticut has an estimated population of 3,510,297,  which is an increase of 11,331, or 0.3%, from the prior year and an increase of 104,695, or 3.1%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 67,427 people (that is 222,222 births minus 154,795 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 41,718 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 75,991 people, and migration  within the country produced a net loss of 34,273 people. Based on the 2005 estimates, Connecticut moves from the 29th most populous state to 30th. 6.6% of its population was reported as being under 5 years old, 24.7% under 18 years old, and 13.8% were 65 years of age or older. Females made up approximately 51.6% of the population, with 48.4% male. In 1790, 97% of the population in Connecticut was classified as “rural”. The first census in which less than half the population was classified as rural was 1890. In the 2000 census, it was only 12.3%. Most of western and southern Connecticut is strongly associated with New York City; this area is the most affluent and populous region of the state. Eastern Connecticut is more culturally influenced by the greater New England area, including the cities of Boston and Providence.

Next stop, Brown University and Newport, Rhode Island.