Delaware Leg Of 2010 Tour


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iWARRIORWALK USA TOUR – STOP #36

WALKED ON OCTOBER 1, 2010

On Friday, October 1, 2010, I (Stanley Bronstein) chose indoor locations for my walk, due to the rainy weather outdoors. I walked for 1 hour at a Planet Fitness Gym in Newark, Delaware. I then walked for 2 hours at nearby Christiana Mall and then for 1 1/2 hours at a nearby Costco. I then walked the remaining half hour (for a total of 5 hours) in a local grocery store.

Highlights of the Delaware leg of the tour:

  • The weather was still pretty wet.  For that reason, I chose to walk indoors, yet again.
  • Initially I picked a gym, but I wasn’t too crazy about the treadmills there, so I decided to find an indoor mall instead.
  • Once my walking was over, I decided to head for Connecticut (my next stop), as soon as possible, due to the bad weather.
  • 2/3 of my drive to Connecticut went without event, but once I got to the George Washington Bridge, the traffic became horrendous.  It took me nearly 2 1/2 hours to go the remaining 71 miles to my  hotel.
  • Once I got to my hotel, the proprietor told me there was a “back route” I could have taken that would have undoubtedly had a lot less traffic.  (Oh well, I’ll know that next time I’m in this area).
  • The weather was still bad, but it appears to be clearing out, so hopefully Saturday’s walking will be uneventful.  Notwithstanding, I believe there was quite a bit of flooding in this area, so I’m hoping that didn’t impact any of the Yale University area where I’m headed.

WILM – 1450 AM Radio in Delaware ran a series of 4 radio spots about the Delaware walk.  You can listen to them as follows:

SHORT TEASER 1

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SHORT TEASER 2

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INTERVIEW 1

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INTERVIEW 2

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As usual, I recorded a podcast which can be listened to

by clicking the button right below these words.

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Here are pictures from my walk. There aren’t a lot of pictures, because I spent the entire time walking indoors in a shopping mall. I didn’t figure anyone would want to see a lot of pictures of a mall.

DOUBLE CLICK ON THE IMAGE THUMBNAILS TO VIEW FULL SIZE PICTURES

Here are 5 fast facts about Delaware:

  • Delaware is a U.S. state located on the Atlantic Coast in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. The state takes its name from Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, an English nobleman and Virginia’s first colonial governor, after whom (what is now called) Cape Henlopen was originally named.
  • Delaware is located in the northeastern portion of the Delmarva Peninsula and is the second smallest state in area (after Rhode Island). Estimates in 2007 rank the population of Delaware as 45th in the nation, but 6th in population density, with more than 60% of the population in New Castle County. Delaware is divided into three counties. From north to south, these three counties are New Castle, Kent, and Sussex. While the southern two counties have historically been predominantly agricultural, New Castle County has been more industrialized.
  • The state ranks second in civilian scientists and engineers as a percentage of the workforce and number of patents issued to companies or individuals per 1,000 workers. The history of the state’s economic and industrial development is closely tied to the impact of the Du Pont family, founders and scions of E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, one of the world’s largest chemical companies.
  • Delaware was one of the thirteen colonies participating in the American Revolution and on December 7, 1787, became the first state to ratify the Constitution of the United States, therefore becoming known as The First State.
  • Many colonial settlers came to Delaware from Maryland and Virginia, which had been experiencing a population boom. The economies of these colonies were chiefly based on tobacco culture and were increasingly dependent on slave labor for its intensive cultivation. Most of the English colonists arrived as indentured servants, hiring themselves out as laborers for a fixed period to pay for their passage. In the early years the line between indentured servants and African slaves  or laborers was fluid. Most of the free African-American families in Delaware before the Revolution had migrated from Maryland to find more affordable land. They were descendants chiefly of relationships or marriages between servant women and enslaved, servant or free African or African-American men. As the flow of indentured laborers to the colony decreased with improving economic conditions in England, more slaves were imported for labor.  At the end of the colonial period, the number of enslaved people in Delaware began to decline. Shifts in the agriculture economy from tobacco to mixed farming created less need for slaves’ labor. Local Methodists and Quakers encouraged slaveholders to free their slaves following the American Revolution, and many did so in a surge of individual manumissions for idealistic reasons. By 1810 three-quarters of all blacks in Delaware were free. When John Dickinson freed his slaves in 1777, he was Delaware’s largest slave owner with 37 slaves. By 1860 the largest slaveholder owned only 16 slaves. Although attempts to abolish slavery failed by narrow margins in the legislature, in practical terms, the state had mostly ended the practice. By the 1860 census on the verge of the Civil War, 91.7 percent of the black population, or nearly 20,000 people, were free.

Next stop, Yale University & University of Connecticut.