Kansas Leg Of 2010 Tour


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iWARRIORWALK USA TOUR – STOP #18

WALKED ON SEPTEMBER 13, 2010

On Monday, September 13, 2010, I (Stanley Bronstein) walked for 5 hours on the campus of the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas and in the surrounding area.

Highlights of the Kansas leg of the tour:

  • The football stadium was open, so I got to walk in and actually walk the field.  Nice stadium they have there with an impressive list of football alumni.
  • Everyone on campus was happy as KU beat Georgia Tech in the previous Saturday’s football game.
  • I was interviewed by two TV stations, ABC Channel 49 and Channel 6 news from Lawrence, Kansas.
  • The school newspaper, the Oread, also interviewed me.
  • I spoke with several students.
  • I found 5 pennies right next to my car.
  • The weather was fantastic. It was about 70 to 80 degrees most of the day.
  • The drive to Columbia, Missouri from Lawrence was short.

HERE IS THE VIDEO FROM THE ABC CHANNEL 49 INTERVIEW:

Here is a TEXT LINK to additional story information on ABC – Channel 49’s website.

HERE IS THE VIDEO FROM THE CHANNEL 6 INTERVIEW:

As usual, I recorded a podcast which can be listened to by clicking the button right below these words.

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OPTIONAL PODCAST DOWNLOAD LINK

Here are pictures from my walk.

DOUBLE CLICK ON THE IMAGE THUMBNAILS TO VIEW FULL SIZE PICTURES

Here are 5 fast facts about the state of Kansas:

  • Kansas is named after the Kansas River which flows through it, which in turn was named after the Kansa tribe, which inhabited the area. The tribe’s name (natively kką:ze) is often said to mean “people of the wind” or “people of the south wind,” although this was probably not the term’s original meaning.
  • Historically, the area was home to large numbers of nomadic Native Americans who hunted bison. It was first settled by European Americans in the 1830s, but the pace of settlement accelerated in the 1850s, in the midst of political wars over the slavery issue.
  • When officially opened to settlement by the U.S. government in 1854, abolitionist Free-Staters from New England and pro-slavery settlers from neighboring Missouri rushed to the territory to determine if Kansas would become a free state or a slave state. Thus, the area was a hotbed of violence and chaos in its early days as these forces collided. The abolitionists eventually prevailed and on January 29, 1861, Kansas entered the Union as a free state.
  • After the Civil War, the population of Kansas grew exponentially, when waves of immigrants turned the prairie into productive farmland. Today, Kansas is one of the most productive agricultural states, producing many crops, and leading the nation in wheat, sorghum and sunflower production most years.
  • The geographic center of the 48 contiguous US states is located in Smith County near Lebanon. The geographic center of North America was located in Osborne County until 1983. This spot was used until that date as the central reference point for all maps of North America produced by the U.S. government. The geographic center of Kansas is located in Barton County.

Next stop, Columbia, Missouri.