Maine Leg Of 2010 Tour


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iWARRIORWALK USA TOUR – STOP #39

WALKED ON OCTOBER 4, 2010

On Monday, October 4, 2010, I (Stanley Bronstein) walked 2 1/2 hours in downtown Portland, Maine. I then walked another hour in nearby Cape Elizabeth, Maine. I then walked 1 1/2 hours in the Sanford, Maine area.

Highlights of the Maine leg of the tour:

  • I got lots of sleep.
  • My internet was down during much of the night, so I had trouble getting my work done.
  • Portland Maine was nearby, so I didn’t have to do that much driving.
  • When in Cape Elizabeth, I found a massage therapist and got the best massage I’ve had so far on the tour.
  • I was able to take a nice nap in the afternoon.

As usual, I recorded a podcast which can be listened to

by clicking the button right below these words.

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OPTIONAL PODCAST DOWNLOAD LINK

Here are pictures from my walk.

DOUBLE CLICK ON THE IMAGE THUMBNAILS TO VIEW FULL SIZE PICTURES

Here are 5 fast facts about Maine:

  • Maine is the northern and easternmost portion of New England. It is known for its scenery—its jagged, mostly rocky coastline, its low, rolling mountains, and its heavily forested interior—as well as for its seafood cuisine, especially lobsters and clams.
  • Maine is the only U.S. state to have a name that is one syllable long, and, in bordering New Hampshire, is the only state which borders exactly one other state.
  • To the south and east is the Atlantic Ocean and to the north and northeast is New Brunswick, a province of Canada. The Canadian province of Quebec is to the northwest. Maine is both the northernmost state in New England  and the largest, accounting for nearly half the region’s entire land area. Maine also has the distinction of being the only state to border just one other state (New Hampshire  to the west). Maine is the easternmost state in the United States both in terms of its extreme points and its geographic center. The municipalities of Eastport and Lubec are, respectively, the easternmost city and town in the United States. Estcourt Station is Maine’s northernmost point, as well as the northernmost point in New England. (For more information see extreme points of the United States).
  • The province within its current boundaries became part of Massachusetts Bay Colony  in 1652. Maine was much fought over by the French and English during the 17th and early 18th centuries. After the defeat of the French in the 1740s, the territory from the Penobscot River east fell under the nominal authority of the Province of Nova Scotia, and together with present day New Brunswick formed the Nova Scotia county of Sunbury, with its court of general sessions at Campobello. American and British forces contended for Maine’s territory during the American Revolution and the War of 1812, and British forces occupied eastern Maine in both conflicts. The treaty concluding revolution was ambiguous about Maine’s boundary with British North America. The territory of Maine was confirmed as part of Massachusetts when the United States was formed, although the final border with British territory was not established until the Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842.  Because it was physically separated from the rest of Massachusetts and was growing in population at a rapid rate, Maine became the 23rd state on March 15, 1820 through the Missouri Compromise. This compromise allowed admitting both Maine and Missouri (in 1821) into the union while keeping a balance between slave and free states. Maine’s original capital was Portland, the largest city in Maine, until it was moved to Augusta in 1832 to make it more central within the state.
  • The Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates that Maine’s total gross state product for 2007 was US$48 billion.[29]  Its per capita personal income for 2007 was US$33,991, 34th in the nation. As of January 2010, Maine’s unemployment rate is 8.2%.  Maine’s agricultural outputs include poultry, eggs, dairy products, cattle, wild blueberries (the state produces 25% of all blueberries in North America, making it the largest blueberry producer in the world), apples, maple syrup and maple sugar. Aroostook County is known for its potato crops. Commercial fishing, once a mainstay of the state’s economy, maintains a presence, particularly lobstering and groundfishing. Western Maine aquifers and springs are a major source of bottled water.  Maine’s industrial outputs consist chiefly of paper, lumber and wood products, electronic equipment, leather products, food products, textiles, and bio-technology. Naval shipbuilding and construction remain key as well, with Bath Iron Works in Bath and Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery. Naval Air Station Brunswick is also in Maine, and serves as a large support base for the U.S. Navy. However, the BRAC campaign recommended Brunswick’s closing, despite a recent government-funded effort to upgrade its facilities.

Next stop, University of New Hampshire in Durham, NH and Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH.