Massachusetts Leg Of 2010 Tour


Error: Path does not exist

iWARRIORWALK USA TOUR – STOP #42

WALKED ON OCTOBER 7, 2010

On Thursday, October 7, 2010, I (Stanley Bronstein) walked 1 1/2 hours on the campus of Tufts University in Medford, MA and the surrounding area.  I then walked for just about 2 hours on the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, MA and the surrounding area.  I then walked the remainder of the 5 hour daily walk at Brandeis University in Waltham, MA and the surrounding area.

Highlights of the Massachusetts leg of the tour:

  • Navigating Boston Logan Airport in order to pick up my wife turned out to not be nearly as big of a hassle as I feared.
  • I got to see my wife for the first time in 27 days.
  • We had a nice dinner at a seafood restaurant, so she got the lobster dinner she’s been craving.
  • The weather turned out to be fairly nice for our visit to the 3 college campuses.
  • Parking at the campuses wasn’t that hard to find.
  • The campuses were all impressive in their own, different ways.
  • We ate lunch on the Brandeis campus and the lunch turned out to be the best meal I’ve eaten in a month.  Yummy !!!  All of it was healthy food too.
  • The drive from Massachusetts to New York wasn’t that bad, although we did hit quite a bit of traffic along the way.  Nothing we couldn’t handle.

As usual, I recorded a podcast which can be listened to

by clicking the button right below these words.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

OPTIONAL PODCAST DOWNLOAD LINK

Here are pictures from my walk.

DOUBLE CLICK ON THE IMAGE THUMBNAILS TO VIEW FULL SIZE PICTURES

Here are 5 fast facts about Massachusetts:

  • Most of its population of 6.6 million lives in the Boston metropolitan area. The eastern half of the state consists of urban, suburban, and rural areas, while Western Massachusetts is mostly rural. Massachusetts is the most populous of the six New England states and ranks third among U.S. states in GDP per capita.
  • Massachusetts has been significant throughout American history. Plymouth  was the second permanent English settlement in North America. Many of Massachusetts’s towns were founded by colonists from England in the 1620s and 1630s. During the eighteenth century, Boston became known as the “Cradle of Liberty” for the agitation there that led to the American Revolution and the independence of the United States from Great Britain. It was also a center of the temperance movement and abolitionist activity before the American Civil War. In 2004, Massachusetts became the first U.S. state to legally recognize same-sex marriage. The state has contributed many prominent politicians to national service, including the Adams family and the Kennedy family.
  • The Massachusetts Bay Colony was named after the indigenous population, the Massachusett, whose name can be segmented as mass-adchu-s-et, where mass- is “large”, -adchu- is “hill”, -s- is a diminutive suffix meaning “small”, and -et is a locative suffix, identifying a place. It has been translated as “near the great hill”, “by the blue hills”, “at the little big hill”, or “at the range of hills”, referring to the Blue Hills, or in particular, Great Blue Hill, located on the boundary of Milton and Canton. Alternatively, Massachusett has been represented as Moswetuset, from the name of the Moswetuset Hummock (meaning “hill shaped like an arrowhead”) in Quincy where Plymouth Colony commander Myles Standish and Squanto, a Native American, met Chief Chickatawbut in 1621.  The official name of the state is the “Commonwealth of Massachusetts”. Colloquially, it is often referred to simply as “the Commonwealth.” While this designation is part of the state’s official name, it has no practical implications. Massachusetts has the same position and powers within the United States as other states.
  • Massachusetts was a center of the movement for independence from Great Britain, earning it the nickname, the “Cradle of Liberty”. Colonists here had long had uneasy relations with the British monarchy, including open rebellion under the Dominion of New England in the 1680s.[50] The Boston Tea Party is an example of the protest spirit in the early 1770s, while the Boston Massacre escalated the conflict. Anti-British activity by men like Sam Adams and John Hancock, followed by reprisals by the British government, were a primary reason for the unity of the Thirteen Colonies and the outbreak of the American Revolution. The Battles of Lexington and Concord initiated the American Revolutionary War and were fought in the Massachusetts towns of Concord and Lexington. Future President George Washington took over what would become the Continental Army after the battle. His first victory was the Siege of Boston in the winter of 1775-6, after which the British were forced to evacuate the city. The event is still celebrated in Suffolk County as Evacuation Day.
  • Bostonian John Adams, known as the “Atlas of Independence”, was an important figure in both the struggle for independence as well as the formation of the new United States. Adams was highly involved in the push for separation from Britain and the writing of the Massachusetts Constitution in 1780 (which, in the Elizabeth Freeman and Quock Walker  cases, effectively made Massachusetts the first state to have a constitution that declared universal rights and, as interpreted by Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice William Cushing, abolished slavery). Later, Adams was active in early American foreign affairs and succeeded Washington as US President. His son, John Quincy Adams, would go on to become the sixth US President.  After independence and during the formative years of independent American government, Shays’ Rebellion was an armed uprising in the western half of the state from 1786 to 1787. The rebels were mostly small farmers angered by crushing war debt and taxes. The rebellion was one of the major factors in the decision to draft a stronger national constitution to replace the Articles of Confederation. On February 6, 1788, Massachusetts became the sixth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. In 1820, Maine separated from Massachusetts, of which it had been first a contiguous and then a non-contiguous part, and entered the Union as the 23rd state as a result of the ratification of the Missouri Compromise.

Next stop, New York.