New York Leg Of 2010 Tour


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iWARRIORWALK USA TOUR – STOP #43

WALKED ON OCTOBER 8, 2010

On Friday, October 8, 2010, I (Stanley Bronstein) walked 2 hours at the Palisades Mall in Nyack, NY.  I then walked for 3 hours in the Yonkers / Bronxville area in New York.  Part of that 3 hours was spent exploring the campus of Sarah Lawrence University in Yonkers.

Highlights of the New York leg of the tour:

  • The weather was great.
  • Traffic wasn’t too bad, considering we were in the New York City area.
  • I’m now out of the NYC area, so hopefully traffic will start getting a little better once I get through New Jersey and Pennsylvania.
  • Palisades Mall in Nyack was an interesting mall.  It’s not always easy to walk for two hours in a mall without getting bored, but Palisades Mall kept things interesting.
  • Yonkers was an unexpected delight.  The area around the Sarah Lawrence University campus was very nice and very relaxing.
  • We had an excellent lunch for the second day in a row.
  • There was a lot of traffic going to New Jersey, but it kept on moving so things went fairly smoothly.
  • Tolls cost $12.55 today.  I am NOT a big fan of toll roads, but one doesn’t have much choice when they’re in the Northeast.

As usual, I recorded a podcast which can be listened to

by clicking the button right below these words.

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OPTIONAL PODCAST DOWNLOAD LINK

Here are pictures from my walk.

DOUBLE CLICK ON THE IMAGE THUMBNAILS TO VIEW FULL SIZE PICTURES

Here are 5 fast facts about New York:

  • New York is the nation’s third most populous state. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east. The state has a maritime border with Rhode Island east of Long Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Ontario to the north and west, and Quebec to the north. New York is often referred to as New York State to distinguish it from New York City.
  • New York City, the most populous city in the United States, is known for its status as a financial, cultural, transportation, and manufacturing center, and for its history as a gateway for immigration  to the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, it is also a destination of choice for many foreign visitors. Both state and city were named for the 17th century Duke of York, James Stuart, future James II and VII of England and Scotland.
  • The borders of the British colony, the Province of New York, were roughly similar to those of the present-day state. About one third of all the battles of the Revolutionary War took place in New York. New York became an independent state on July 9, 1776, and enacted its constitution in 1777. The state ratified the United States Constitution on July 26, 1788 to become the eleventh state of the union.
  • The Sons of Liberty were organized in New York City during the 1760s, largely in response to the oppressive Stamp Act passed by the British Parliament in 1765. The Stamp Act Congress met in the city on October 19 of that year: a gathering of representatives from across the Thirteen Colonies that set the stage for the Continental Congress to follow. The Stamp Act Congress resulted in the Declaration of Rights and Grievances, which was the first written expression by representatives of the Americans of many of the rights and complaints later expressed in the United States Declaration of Independence, including the right to representative government.  The Capture of Fort Ticonderoga provided the cannon and gunpowder necessary to force a British withdrawal from the Siege of Boston in 1775.  New York endorsed the Declaration of Independence on July 9, 1776. The New York state constitution was framed by a convention which assembled at White Plains, New York on July 10, 1776, and after repeated adjournments and changes of location, terminated its labors at Kingston, New York on Sunday evening, April 20, 1777, when the new constitution drafted by John Jay was adopted with but one dissenting vote. It was not submitted to the people for ratification. On July 30, 1777, George Clinton was inaugurated as the first Governor of New York at Kingston.
  • Transportation in western New York was difficult before canals were built in the early part of the nineteenth century. The Hudson and Mohawk Rivers could be navigated only as far as Central New York. While the St. Lawrence River could be navigated to Lake Ontario, the way westward to the other Great Lakes was blocked by Niagara Falls, and so the only route to western New York was over land.  Governor DeWitt Clinton strongly advocated building a canal to connect the Hudson River with Lake Erie, and thus all the Great Lakes. Work commenced in 1817, and the Erie Canal was finished in 1825. It was considered an engineering marvel. Packet boats traveled up and down the canal with sightseers and visitors on board. The canal opened up vast areas of New York to commerce and settlement. It enabled Great Lakes port cities such as Buffalo and Rochester to grow and prosper. It also connected the burgeoning agricultural production of the Midwest and shipping on the Great Lakes, with the port of New York City. Improving transportation, it enabled additional population migration to territories west of New York.

Next stop, New Jersey.