Utah Leg Of 2010 Tour


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iWARRIORWALK USA TOUR – STOP #11

WALKED ON AUGUST 28, 2010

On Saturday, August 28, 2010, I (Stanley Bronstein) walked for 5 hours in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah.

The Utah leg of the tour went well:

  • My wife and I visited the Mormon Historic Temple Square in downtown Salt Lake.  I shot a video of the entire square and it can be seen below.
  • We met some nice people and took a nice stroll through lovely Memory Grove Park.
  • We discovered a FANTASTIC Asian restaurant called Five Star Restaurant that served Thai, Filipino and Chinese cuisine.  It was some of the best Asian food we’ve eaten in quite some time.  Plus, we were able to walk for an hour afterwards to aide digestion.

HERE’S A VIDEO OF THE MORMON HISTORIC TEMPLE SQUARE AREA IN DOWNTOWN SALT LAKE CITY

As usual, I recorded a podcast which can be listened to by clicking the button right below these words.

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OPTIONAL PODCAST DOWNLOAD LINK

Here are pictures from my walk.

DOUBLE CLICK ON THE IMAGE THUMBNAILS TO VIEW FULL SIZE PICTURES



Here are 5 fast facts about the state of Utah:

  • Utah was the 45th state admitted to the United States, on January 4, 1896.
  • Approximately 80% of Utah’s 2,784,572 people live along the Wasatch Front, centering on Salt Lake City. This leaves vast expanses of the state nearly uninhabited, making the population the sixth most urbanized in the U.S.
  • The name “Utah” is derived from the name of the Ute tribe and means “people of the mountains” in the Ute language.
  • Utah is one of the most religiously homogeneous states in the Union. Between 41% and 60% of Utah’s inhabitants are reported to be members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (also known as the LDS Church or Mormon Church), which greatly influences Utah culture and daily life.
  • Following the death of Joseph Smith, in Carthage, Illinois, in 1844, the more than 11,000 Latter Day Saints remaining in Nauvoo, IL struggled in conflict with neighbors until Brigham Young, the President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, emerged as the leader of the largest portion. Brigham Young and the first band of Mormon pioneers came to the Salt Lake Valley on July 24, 1847. Over the next 22 years, more than 70,000 pioneers crossed the plains and settled in Utah. For the first few years Brigham Young and the thousands of early settlers of Salt Lake City struggled to survive. The barren desert land was deemed by the Mormons as desirable as a place they could practice their religion without interference.

Next stop, Ontario, Oregon.